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Zbigniew Grochowski

Zbigniew Grochowski was born on 31st August 1926 in Lublin. During the outbreak of war his family stayed in Brest (currently Belarus). In late autumn 1939, after first deportations of Poles to Siberia in Soviet Union, Grochowski’s parents decided to flee to Lublin to join their relatives. Due to his father’s underground activity and imprisonment of his mother’s relatives, the family moved to Warsaw where they survived nazi occupation. There Grochowski completed the underground secondary school and joined Szare Szeregi (Grey Ranks - boy scout underground movement), taking part in petty sabotage actions and taking photos of German installations and street executions. Grochowski spent the first month of Warsaw Uprising in the Old Town at 10, Sapieżyńska Street, using code name Stefan Zabłocki. After the fall of the Old Town he, together with his mother and brother, was evacuated among the civilian population to transit camp Dulag 121 in Pruszków, and then sent to Germany to work at a farm. After the war he returned to his native Lublin, graduated from the department of geology at Maria Curie Sklodowska University and worked as a teacher. In early 50-ties he was posted to Legnica where he continued teaching physics and mathematics and where he lives until today. His great passion has been leading youth summer camps in the most beautiful regions of Poland. Each year for over 20 years he gave several hundred lectures on pedagogical matters in rural evening courses and „parents’ universities”. He has remained an avid cultivator of knowledge and memory of Warsaw Uprising, devoting much time to lecturing on this subject. He received many awards and decorations for his professional and volunteer work.

 

  • The first part of Grochowski’s collection comes from the time of German occupation and shows street stroller’s view of Warsaw’s Old Town. The second part constitutes of several pictures of fighting Old Town, showing young insurgent soldiers, first casualties and burning houses. Third and largest part comes from 1945 and shows Warsaw immediately after the war - ruins of houses and churches, exhumations and inscriptions commemorating the dead, as well as inhabitants adapting to new conditions, petty trade and service advertisements, street stalls and starting reconstruction of the city.
MPW-IP/2729
MPW-IP/2729
MPW-IP/2695
MPW-IP/2695
MPW-IP/2747
MPW-IP/2747
MPW-IP/2808
MPW-IP/2808
MPW-IP/2829
MPW-IP/2829
MPW-IP/2830
MPW-IP/2830
MPW-IP/2925
MPW-IP/2925
MPW-IP/2831
MPW-IP/2831
MPW-IP/2922
MPW-IP/2922
MPW-IP/2874
MPW-IP/2874
MPW-IP/2837
MPW-IP/2837
MPW-IP/2892
MPW-IP/2892
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